The Brooklyn Growler

"Life is all skittles and beer." — Tom Lehrer

Vermont No. 1 in Unofficial Per Capita List of U.S. Breweries

While doing some research yesterday, I began to wonder what state had the most breweries in the U.S. in 2010. Because I couldn’t find the data I wanted, I started collecting it myself.

The results were not what I expected. States with smaller populations actually had the largest per capita number of breweries. Vermont, with a population of just over 600,000 people topped the list, beating California which is just shy of 40 million people.

Go figure. Just because there are more people and more of a certain thing in a place, doesn’t mean that it diffuses as far into the culture. I think. I guess. I suppose.

Before I get to a sample of the data, I want to share my methods for the data collection.

First, I pulled all of the state-by-state population numbers from the 2010 Census. That includes all fifty states plus Washington, D.C. for a total of fifty-one entries. Second, I used Beer Advocate’s current list of Beer Places in the U.S. to get a statewide number of breweries. For this number, I combined both state-by-state numbers of breweries and brewpubs. The Brewer’s Association defines a brewpub as “A restaurant-brewery that sells 25% or more of its beer on site.” They brew beer. Fair game. Then I calculated how many breweries each state had for each 100,000 residents.

This list is, of course, unofficial. These numbers have not been collected by any official agency or professional number cruncher. This 2010 per capita list was created primarily as an intellectual exercise. I welcome input, arguments, corrections, clarifications, and questions.

The data for previous years has been expertly compiled by the Brewer’s Association (2008) and by Lug Wrench Brewing (2009). I have not included their data in my chart, but I have referred to it for the purposes of this informal analysis.

Also, I have created a public Google spreadsheet of the data (plus here is a version you can manipulate). If you would like a copy as an Excel file or PDF, my contact info is in the sidebar.

That all said–

2010: Top 5 Breweries Per Capita U.S. States

2010 Rank State 2010 Population Breweries & Brewpubs Breweries Per 100,000
1 Vermont 625,741 21 3.36
2 Oregon 3,831,074 110 2.87
3 Maine 1,328,361 37 2.79
4 Montana 989,415 25 2.53
5 Wyoming 563,626 13 2.31

2010: Bottom 5 Breweries Per Capita U.S. States

2010 Rank State 2010 Population Breweries & Brewpubs Breweries Per 100,000
47 Texas 25,145,561 39 0.15
48 North Dakota 672,591 1 0.15
49 Arkansas 2,915,918 4 0.14
50 Alabama 4,779,736 5 0.1
51 Mississippi 2,967,297 1 o.3

The results indicate that even though a state might have the highest population, it does not have the highest number of breweries/brewpubs per capita. California’s population (37,253,956) makes it the highest-populated state in the U.S. and it also has the most breweries/brewpubs (255). However, it is No. 19 for per capita breweries on my list.

Vermont, which is No. 1 per capita, is the the 49th largest state by actual population. Since 2008 (at least) it has been the state with the most breweries per capita, according to the Brewer’s Association and Lug Wrench. The Top 5 shifts from year to year. Montana was at No. 2 in 2008, No. 3 in 2009, and has fallen to No. 4 in 2010.

Wyoming was the least-populated U.S. state in 2010 and yet it makes it into the Top 5 for per capita breweries. Montana is the forty-fourth most populated state, and it consistently remains in the Top 5.

To put this in perspective, states with the largest populations actually have the smallest per capita number of breweries. So Texas has 0.15 breweries for every 100,000 people, while Vermont has 3.36 breweries for every 100,000 people.

What conclusions can we draw from this informal sampling?

Except for North Dakota (Midwest), the Bottom 5 states are all southern states. Meanwhile, the Top 5 are in the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast.

Though these northern states in the Top 5 have smaller populations of people, those people help foster environments that are rich in brewing beer – mostly craft beer. Does that mean those in the Top 5 produce the best beers in the country or, necessarily, have the best beer cultures?

No, not necessarily.

It does make me wonder… What’s more important? To have more to enjoy or to be able to enjoy less more?

All I can say is definitively is – let’s all go to Vermont and get drunk.

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Sunday Foto Dump: State of the Universe

Apparently, I’m not very good at updating these Brooklyn Growler branded Friday Photo Dump™ posts. I miss writing a new one on Friday and then think I’ll plug in a post to auto-pop on the next Friday. When that doesn’t happen, I promise to hit it next time.

Which made me re-evaluate my approach.

Friday Photo Dump. Yeah. I only decided to give this style of blog post a name back when I was thinking that I’d update it regularly throughout the week. Here was the idea for this blog from my Kickstarter proposal:

Malty Maudlin Mondays – Kind of a morning-after thing about news missed over the weekend as well as a round-up of drinks that should not have been consumed over the weekend but were.

Trappist Tuesdays – A weekly review of a Trappist beer that has already been effectively reviewed over at Beer Advocate.

Wet-Hop Wednesdays – This was going to be difficult because, offhand, I know of one wet-hopped beer. It’s about the challenge, I guess.

Trappist Thursdays – Because the chances of me remembering to hit Trappist Tuesdays are pretty slim.

Friday Photo Dump – See above.

Storm King Saturdays and Sundays – Which isn’t the title but rather a rule. I don’t work on weekends. Although it is Sunday night and I’m writing this. I cannot be trusted.

This blog is beginning to take proper shape in my head. It’s about a life as it encounters beer. “Here then is a map of my life,” as Auden said in his common reader. Hey, that would be a great lede!

So tying things down to a particular weekday gets it wrong.

Preamble sorted. Here are some pictures of beers whut have been drunk over the last few weeks by me. (P.S. These are just the ones I remembered to photograph.)

Stone Brewing Co., Arrogant Bastard Ale, Escondido, Calif.

Groupo Modelo, Modelo Especial, Mexico City, Mexico

Unibroue, Maudite, Chambly, Quebec, Canada

21st Amendment Brewery, Brew Free or Die IPA, San Francisco, Calif.

Thank you for reading this far. There will be more to come.

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Little Brewery, Big Dreams of a Hop Bust

The hubbub today about beer distributors opposing California’s Prop 19, which would legalize marijuana, made me think of this anecdote by Anchor Steam‘s Fritz Maytag.

In this video produced by Reason.tv, Maytag relates a story about trying to get busted in the sixties with a bag of hops in San Francisco (skip to about minute 2:55 for the story, but the whole video is great):

In Maytag’s words:

“I had to drive through the Haight every night. I used to get hop samples that are green fluffy leafy things, and at one point I realized we are desperate for publicity and there’d be nothing better than getting arrested for having what would look like something green and leafy in my car and turn out to be hops. Y’know, false arrest. ‘Brewer is arrested for hops.’ In those days there weren’t any ‘little breweries.’ I mean, nobody had ever heard of anybody owning a brewery. let alone driving around with hops. I put hops on the passenger seat of my car. I had a little Porsche, and I drove home with the hops on the seat for – back and forth – at least a week, hoping to get arrested. Well, you couldn’t get arrested in the Haight-Ashbury in those days.”

Even without the bust, things ended up working out for Maytag and Anchor Steam.

Fritz Maytag is the great-grandson of Fredrick Louis Maytag who founded the Maytag Corporation. In 1965, Maytag purchased San Francisco’s Steam Brewing Company, which produced Anchor Steam Beer. At the time, Anchor Steam was known for being a godawful beer that was so bad, its brewery was on the verge of shutting its doors forever.

Maytag purchased the company, changed its recipe and brewing process, and took his “little brewery” to the big time. His success helped inspire many the craft beer movement in the seventies and the creation of many microbreweries throughout the U.S.

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Brewers Staying out of Marijuana Legalization Debate

In California, beer distributors are getting together to oppose the proposed legalization of marijuana.

On the ballot in California this November will be Proposition 19, a measure that would legalize marijuana and allow it to be taxed and regulated. California Beer & Beverage Distributors have contributed $10,000 to a committee that opposes Proposition 19, reports the Redding Record Searchlight.

The donation went to Safety First, the main coalition opposing Prop 19.

“Unless the beer distributors in California have suddenly developed a philosophical opposition to the use of intoxicating substances, the motivation behind this contribution is clear,” said Steve Fox, Marijuana Policy Project government relations director in a press release. “Plain and simple, the alcohol industry is trying to kill the competition.”

Two law enforcement agencies that oppose Prop 19 include the California Police Chiefs Association, which has donated about $30,000 and the California Narcotics Officers’ Association, which has donated about $20,500.

Meanwhile, California brewers such as Sierra Nevada and Stone Brewing Co. took to their Facebook pages to release statements saying that neither company supports this campaign.

“Stone is not a part of this campaign in any way,” said Stone Brewing. “This issue has caught us of off guard. We are merely a non-voting Allied Member of the CA Beer & Beverage Distributors (CBBD). As such, Stone Brewing does not/cannot participate in the political action decisions of the CBBD.”

In its statement, Sierra Nevada also clarified its position.

“Although we are members of this organization, we were neither consulted – nor informed of – their decision to take a stand against California Proposition 19. Sierra Nevada’s role as an associate member grants no access or influence on the political agendas of the CBBD, and we had no knowledge of the organization’s intention to fight this ballot proposition,” said the company.

“We feel that people have the obligation to choose what is right for themselves without influence from outside interests,” Sierra Nevada said.

California has previously legalized medical marijuana.

Proposition 19 will be on the ballot in California on November 2, 2010.

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Photodump Friday: This Is Not a Lawnmower Beer

Estrella Damm, Barcelona, Spain.

Pabst Blue Ribbon, Woodbridge, Ill.

Sierra Nevada, Tumbler Autumn Brown Ale, Chico, Calif.

Pretty Things, American Darling Good Time Lager, Cambridge, Mass.

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